The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan

 

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 Dec 21, 1956 - The first party of Hungarian refugees, fleeing Soviet oppression in their homeland, arrived in Regina.

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  • Weyburn 98% The Weyburn Review, founded in 1909, is the city’s daily newspaper; Weyburn This Week is published weekly. The city has a wide range of sports and recreation facilities; the Weyburn Colosseum is home to the Weyburn Red Wings of the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League. Weyburn has two museums, the Soo Line Historical Museum and the Turner Curling Museum; Weyburn’s public library houses the Allie Griffin Art Gallery, which has monthly exhibits featuring the works of local, regional, ...
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  • Butters, M. Isabelle (1929–) 94% Butters, M. Isabelle (1929-) - M. Isabelle Butters, an influential figure in Weyburn's commerce and community development, has received international, national, and provincial recognition. Born in Weyburn, April 22, 1929, she attended a rural school, then Weyburn Collegiate, and business school. She has served on the Weyburn Arts Council, the Weyburn Community Health Council, the Chamber of Commerce, the Weyburn Union Hospital Board and Executive, the Community Development Committee, the ...
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  • Carbon Dioxide Storage 87% Carbon Dioxide Storage - A four-year multidisciplinary study released in 2004 concluded that carbon dioxide-a greenhouse gas-can be stored safely underground in geological formations such as the Weyburn oil fields in southeastern Saskatchewan. The Petroleum Technology Research Centre (PTRC) in Regina conducted the study under the auspices of the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas (IEA GHG) Research and Development Programme and in close collaboration with EnCana Corporation of ...
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  • Mental Health Services 86% Mental Health Services - Prior to 1905, Saskatchewan patients requiring mental hospital care were sent to Manitoba. In 1913 MacNeill spent eight months in England and the United States, studying psychiatry and familiarizing himself with mental hospital organization in order to prepare for his new role as the first medical superintendent of the Saskatchewan Hospital North Battleford. As admissions to mental hospitals increased, MacNeill struggled with the constant problem of overcrowding: in ...
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  • Weyburn Inland Terminal 85% Weyburn Inland Terminal (WIT) is the first inland grain terminal in Canada to be completely owned and operated by farmers. The $5.5 million grain-handling facility, located on Highway 39 about 3.5 km southeast of Weyburn, opened November 2, 1976, with a 540,000 tonne annual throughput capacity for wheat, barley and other grains. The terminal was built after 1,300 southern Saskatchewan farmers, who wanted to add more responsiveness and fairness to Canada’s grain-handling system, raised ...
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  • McKinnon, Eleanor (1912–2004) 85% McKinnon, Eleanor (1912-2004) - Eleanor McKinnon was born in Weyburn on October 22, 1912, the daughter of Norman McKinnon, the owner of "Saskatchewan's foremost store." Eleanor McKinnon attended Brandon College, then for nine years was secretary to Dr. Campbell at the Weyburn Mental Hospital. Every letter was answered: McKinnon composed most of the responses, but Douglas read every word and signed each reply, often writing in additional comments. ...
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  • Highway Network 85% Highway Network - Saskatchewan's highway network consists of 26,250 km of roads, or roughly 14% of the province's entire rural road network. The Yellowhead Highway soon after became eligible for federal assistance, as did Highways 6, 7, 11, and 39. Each of these provincial highways was an important link in the national highway system, and was therefore entitled to funding under the National Highways Project. Major north-south arteries include: Highway 6 from Montana to Regina and Melfort; ...
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  • South Saskatchewan Regiment 83% South Saskatchewan Regiment - Authorized in the districts of Assiniboia and Saskatchewan on July 3, 1905, the South Saskatchewan Regiment originated as the 95th Regiment. It was reorganized into five regiments in May 1924: the Regina Rifles Regiment, the Assiniboia Regiment, the Weyburn Regiment, the Saskatchewan Border Regiment, and the South Saskatchewan Regiment. The South Saskatchewan Regiment was once again reorganized on December 15, 1936, with the amalgamation of the Weyburn Regiment ...
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  • Douglas, Thomas Clement (1904–86) 83% Douglas, Thomas Clement (1904-86) - Premier and national party leader Tommy Douglas was Saskatchewan's most notable and influential politician. The Scottish Independent Labour Party had heavily influenced his father Tom, and that set the tone for Douglas' political education. After his re-election in 1940, many Saskatchewan CCF activists called for Douglas to return to provincial politics and lead the provincial CCF. ...
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  • Yellow Grass 81% Yellow Grass - Town, pop 422, located 25 km NW of Weyburn on Hwy 39. Yellow Grass is also located on the CPR Soo Line , which runs from Moose Jaw through Estevan and down through the USA. The early population was predominantly German, and the Yellow Grass post office was established in 1896. Yellow Grass, along with the town of Midale to the southeast, holds the record for having had the highest temperature ever recorded in Canada: on July 5, 1937, the mercury hit 45° Celsius (113° ...
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  • Sharon, Maurice William (1875– 1940) 81% Sharon, Maurice William (1875- 1940) - Many of Saskatchewan's most impressive public buildings were designed by its second Provincial Architect, Maurice William Sharon. Estevan Court House (also a Provincial Heritage Property) is considered Saskatchewan's finest example of the Colonial style, exhibiting a symmetric design and fine detailing in stone and brick. Sharon's other Colonial courthouse designs are Assiniboia and Weyburn (both Provincial Heritage Properties), Gravelbourg, Kerrobert, ...
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  • Saskatchewan Bill of Rights 81% Saskatchewan Bill of Rights - In 1947, a year before the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights , Saskatchewan passed into law a bill of rights which was, and continues to be, unique. The second category prohibited discrimination in employment (section 8), occupations and businesses (section 9), property (section 10), accommodation and services (section 11), and professional associations and unions (section 12). The first category of the ...
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  • Mitchell, W.O. (1914–98) 81% Mitchell, W.O. (1914-98) - William Ormond Mitchell is best remembered for Who Has Seen the Wind and the Jake and the Kid stories which grew out of and defined the Saskatchewan prairie. Mitchell adapted the stories for a CBC television series (1961), but his most successful television plays were The Devil’s Instrument (CBC, 1962) and Back to Beulah (CBC, 1974), which won the ACTRA award for best script. Mitchell was honoured by his home province, receiving his first honorary degree ...
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  • Levee, Roy (1935–) 81% Levee, Roy (1935-) - Born on August 7, 1935, to Glenn and Ella Levee, Roy grew up on the family farm near Radville, Saskatchewan. His wintertime off-farm employment over the years included urban assessment work with the Provincial Assessment Branch, and instructing farm business management for the provincial Department of Agriculture. His most notable achievement was his commitment to the Weyburn Inland Terminal (WIT), Canada’s first inland grain terminal owned and operated by farmers ...
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  • Hospitals 81% In 1906, hospitals opened in Moose Jaw, Lloydminster and Wakaw, followed in 1907 by the Grey Nuns hospital in Regina and the Lady Minto hospital in Melfort, in 1909 by Saskatoon City Hospital, in 1910 by Holy Family Hospital in Prince Albert, in 1911 by Notre Dame Hospital in North Battleford, and in 1912 by Swift Current, Weyburn, St Elizabeth's in Humboldt, and Providence Hospital in Moose Jaw. In Saskatoon in March 2003, 638 acute care beds were divided as follows: Royal University ...
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  • Baptist Union of Western Canada 81% Baptist Union of Western Canada - The history of the Baptist Union of Western Canada (BUWC) has its roots in the missionary efforts of the Baptist Missionary Convention of Ontario, which in 1869 sent two Baptist ministers to what was then called the North-West. The most prominent Baptist churches in several cities in Saskatchewan were called "First" churches to distinguish them from other Baptist churches in the community and to establish visibility and prominence in the city. As a result, ...
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  • Hjertaas, Orville K. (1917–98) 79% As a member and, briefly, secretary of the Health Services Planning Commission, he helped organize the province’s first two experimental health regions in the Swift Current and Weyburn areas in 1945-46. He then served briefly as the Swift Current Health Region ’s first medical health officer before settling permanently in Prince Albert, where he established a successful private practice. In response to the doctors’ strike, which he refused to join, Hjertaas helped establish ...
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  • Warships with Saskatchewan Names 79% Warships with Saskatchewan Names - Beginning in World War II , the Canadian navy has frequently honoured a variety of Saskatchewan communities in the naming of its warships. There have been several warships with Saskatchewan names, ranging in size from destroyers, frigates and corvettes, down to the small but vital harbour tankers (oilers) such as HMCS Dundurn . Two ships with Saskatchewan names, HMCS Regina and HMCS Weyburn , were sunk during World War II. ...
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  • Sisters of Our Lady of the Cross 79% Other schools where the Sisters taught were St. Hubert via Whitewood (1907-68); St. Anne Convent, Wauchope (1917-64); Sacred Heart Convent, with three public school classrooms; Montmartre (1920-70); and the School for Mentally Challenged Children and Adults, Redvers (1964-80). The congregation also founded and owned Joan of Arc Home; St. Hubert Mission via Whitewood (1920-68); St. Joseph Home, Marcelin (1944-56); Mount St. Mary Home, Weyburn (1953-77); and Mount St. Joseph, Prince Albert ( ...
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  • Sisters of Loretto: Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary (IBVM) 79% Sisters of Loretto: Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary (IBVM) - The Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Sisters of Loretto, IBVM), whose special work is education, was founded in the early 1600s by an Englishwoman, Mary Ward. Five Loretto sisters came to the diocese of Toronto from Ireland in 1847 at the request of Bishop Michael Power to establish Catholic educational institutions for girls. In Saskatchewan, the Loretto sisters established girls' boarding schools and taught in Catholic ...
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  • Salemka, Irene (1931–) 79% Salemka, Irene (1931-) - Born on October 3, 1931, in Steinbach, Manitoba, the daughter of a Lutheran pastor, Irene Salemka studied voice in Regina, Montreal, Toronto, and in Germany. ” Recognized for her performance as Juliette at the 1952 Montreal Festival, she made a spectacular debut as Cio Cio San at Toronto’s Royal Alexandra Theatre in 1953 in the presence of an admiring Vincent Massey. Salemka returned to Canada that year to perform in Regina, Moose Jaw and Weyburn, and ...
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  • Royal Air Force 79% The Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Naval Air Service, forerunners of the Royal Air Force, made administrative and instructional personnel available at training establishments in Canada. 25 EFTS (RCAF), operated by Central Manitoba Flying Training School Ltd. on July 6, 1942. The students trained at these schools were predominantly RAF; but as the following numbers indicate, some were from other partners in the plan (see Table RAF-1). Students from EFTS continued their training at SFTS so ...
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  • Roman Catholic Congregations of Women Religious 79% The next group of Sisters came just before World War I . In 1913 the Sisters of Notre Dame came from Auvergne, France to Ponteix, where they ran a boarding school until 1952 and taught in six public schools (1940-76). The Sisters of Sion also ran boarding schools in Moose Jaw (1914-91) and Saskatoon (1919-66), operated a women's residence in Saskatoon (1917-76), and taught in several elementary schools in both cities. Other teaching orders and their major schools included the Sisters of Our ...
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  • Radville 79% Radville - Town, pop 735, located approximately 50 km SW of Weyburn, on Long Creek, at the junction of Hwys 28 and 377. The town’s importance as a railway hub diminished substantially when the roundhouse was shut down in the 1950s; yet today Radville remains an important commercial and cultural centre in the district. Three of Radville’s earliest buildings have been designated heritage properties, including the Canadian Northern Railway Station, which was built in 1912 and now ...
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  • Public Libraries 79% By 1967, seven regional libraries replaced the many random private libraries that existed across the province: Lakeland Library Region (North Battleford area); Wapiti Regional Library (Prince Albert area); Wheatland Regional Library (Saskatoon west area); Parkland Regional Library (Yorkton area); Chinook Regional Library (Swift Current area); Palliser Regional Library (Moose Jaw area); and Southeast Regional Library (Weyburn area). The Public Libraries Act of 1996 established a structure for ...
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  • Psychiatric Nursing 79% Psychiatric Nursing - At the Saskatchewan Hospital North Battleford from 1914, and at the Saskatchewan Hospital Weyburn from 1921, ward attendants cared for mentally ill patients. After a study commissioned by the new CCF government in 1944, a three-year in-hospital psychiatric nursing training program commenced in September 1947, leading to a Diploma in Psychiatric Nursing. In 1948, an Act Respecting Psychiatric Nurses was passed, and the Saskatchewan Psychiatric Nurses' Association began ...
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  • Ogema 79% This unique pair of structures remain features of Ogema’s Main Street to this day; interestingly, the contractor who built them was Robert John Lecky, who had been the construction superintendent during the erection of the Saskatchewan Legislative Building . In response, community leaders in Ogema and other area communities sought initiatives and partnerships, and advanced the concept of a regional economy. In recent years, the Saskatchewan Government’s Action Committee on the ...
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  • Nature Saskatchewan 79% Nature Saskatchewan - Isabel Priestly founded the Saskatchewan Natural History Society or Nature Saskatchewan (the Society) in 1949. During the early years, the Society focused on education about natural history through meeting programs and conservation advocacy; it has published the regional natural history journal Blue Jay since 1949. It is affiliated with the Canadian Nature Federation, and with local natural history societies in Regina, Saskatoon, Moose Jaw, Prince Albert, Swift Current ...
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  • Military History of Saskatchewan 79% The Canadian militia was reorganized, and in Military District 12 the infantry formed two units: the North Saskatchewan Regiment and the South Saskatchewan Regiment. 10th Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, the now Royal Regina Rifles, the North Saskatchewan Regiment, and the Saskatchewan Dragoons maintain their presence in the cities of Regina, Yorkton, Saskatoon, Prince Albert and Moose Jaw. Veterans from Saskatchewan who have served Canada are represented by various organizations ...
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  • Milestone 79% Milestone - Town, pop 542, located between Regina and Weyburn on Hwy 39. Agriculture is the major industry in the region and consists of a combination of grain, specialty crop, and livestock production. Seed cleaning, pulse crop processing, and small manufacturers add diversity to Milestone’s economy. In the subsequent decades, the community experienced steady growth; unlike many Saskatchewan communities, Milestone has had a relatively stable population since the mid-1950s. ...
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  • Midale 79% Midale - Town, pop 496, located roughly midway between Weyburn and Estevan on Hwy 39. Many who first settled the Midale district were of Norwegian and Swedish origin and came from the states of Minnesota and Iowa. The discovery of oil in the Midale area in 1953 not only diversified the economy, which had been solely based upon agriculture, but also led to a doubling of the village population. Midale shares the distinction with the town of Yellow Grass as having had the highest temperature& ...
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  • McLeod, Thomas H. (1918–) 79% McLeod, Thomas H. (1918-) - Thomas McLeod, born on August 11, 1918, in Weyburn, associated there with T.C. Douglas as a teenager during the early 1930s. Having obtained his PhD from Harvard University during a leave of absence from the public service, McLeod became Dean of Commerce at the University of Saskatchewan in 1952. Following his academic career in Saskatchewan, McLeod went on to do extensive international development work in the Third World—in Turkey with the Ford Foundation, ...
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  • MacKay, Harold (1940–) 79% MacKay, Harold (1940-) - An expert in the country's legal, business, and financial sectors, Harold MacKay was born in Regina on August 1, 1940, and received his early education at Weyburn Collegiate Institute. In addition to practicing as a lawyer, MacKay chaired the Federal Business Development Bank from 1981 to 1985 and the Task Force on the Future of the Canadian Financial Services Sector in 1998. Provincially, he served as special representative to Saskatchewan's Minister of Post- ...
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  • Longmore, Rosalee (1952–) 79% After graduating from high school in Weyburn, she attended nursing school in Regina and in 1976 graduated as a registered nurse. She became an active member of the Saskatchewan Union of Nurses (SUN) Local 66, where she served as vice-president, president, and member of the negotiating committee. As SUN president she also serves as vice-president of the Saskatchewan Federation of Labour and on the Executive Board of the Canadian Federation of Nurses. ...
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  • Labour Councils and the Canadian Labour Congress 79% Labour Councils and the Canadian Labour Congress - The Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) was formed in 1956 when the Trades and Labour Congress of Canada (TLC), representing the skilled trades, amalgamated with the Canadian Congress of Labour (CCL), representing industrial workers. Saskatchewan currently has seven chartered labour councils: Regina and District Labour Council (chartered 1907), Saskatoon DLC (1912), Moose Jaw DLC (1906), North Battleford DLC, Prince Albert DLC, Weyburn DLC, and ...
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  • Knights of Columbus 79% Knights of Columbus - The Knights of Columbus is an international Catholic men's fraternal benefit society founded in 1882 by Father Michael J. McGivney of New Haven, Connecticut to render mutual aid and financial assistance to members and their families in times of need. The first Knights of Columbus council in Saskatchewan was formed in Regina in 1907, followed by Saskatoon and Prince Albert (1910), Moose Jaw (1911), Weyburn (1914), Humboldt (1917), Yorkton and Gravelbourg (1919), and ...
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  • Hummingbirds 79% Hummingbirds - Hummingbirds (family Trochilidae), limited to the Western Hemisphere, are small to tiny birds with short tails, long bills, and long primaries used for hovering flight. The ruby-throated hummingbird ( Archilochus colubris ) is the only breeding hummingbird in Saskatchewan, found nesting in the southern boreal forest, aspen parkland, and the Cypress Hills . Rarer are the black-chinned hummingbird ( Archilochus alexandri ) (Regina, Weyburn), Anna's hummingbird ( Calypte anna ) ...
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  • Hockey 79% While both junior and senior hockey thrived, the 1920s were most notable for the short life of the Western Canada Hockey League (WCHL), a major-league professional organization of equal calibre to the National Hockey League and whose champions competed for the Stanley Cup against the NHL's best teams. Junior hockey, at its elite level, shifted from a provincial to a regional concern in 1966 with the creation of the Canadian Major Junior Hockey League (later the Western Canada Hockey League ...
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  • Health Services Planning Commission, 1944–50 79% Health Services Planning Commission, 1944-50 - The Health Services Planning Commission (HSPC) was created in November 1944 to serve as a central health planning and advisory body to the new Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) government of T.C. Douglas . The Department of Public Health had focused primarily on public health activities and not on planning a comprehensive public health, medical and hospital scheme for the province. The Commission proved instrumental in launching a ...
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  • Health Care 79% Health Care - Saskatchewan’s Leadership Although most Canadians are aware that Saskatchewan was a leader in establishing national medicare, few people, even in Saskatchewan, know how the province came to take on its leadership role. Municipal Doctors and Municipal Hospitals In Saskatchewan, an early step toward medicare was the creation of the first municipal doctor and municipal hospital schemes in North America. Within the Swift Current Health Region (Saskatchewan’s Health ...
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  • Hamilton, Charles McGill (1878– 1952) 79% Hamilton, Charles McGill (1878- 1952) - Born on January 17, 1878, in Whitechurch, Ontario, Hamilton came with his family to farm in Saskatchewan in 1892. During his time in the provincial Cabinet, Hamilton also held the positions of Minister of Municipal Affairs, Minister of Highways, and Minister of the Child Welfare Act. Hamilton worked to help provide relief for the farmers seeking assistance, both as Minister of Agriculture and Minister of Municipal Affairs. ...
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  • Francis 79% Francis - Town, pop 172, located approximately 60 km SE of Regina on Hwy 33 and 50 km N of Weyburn on Hwy 35. First settled around 1900 by Scots from the historic Glengarry County, Ontario, Francis was incorporated as a village in 1904, the same year that the CPR had trains running between Arcola and Regina. Francis has a small business community, consisting mainly of farm suppliers; there are two grain elevators. Francis School is a K–6 facility, which had 66 students enrolled in the ...
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  • Drug Plan 79% Drug Plan - Since 1945, public drug benefits have been an area of notable Saskatchewan innovation and change. The legislation had the effect of encouraging generic drug products and lowering prescription drug prices. Two provincial studies-a 1966 study of prescription drug costs incurred by Weyburn area residents and a 1973 review of provincial prices and prescribing practices-revealed an uneven distribution of drug use and cost among residents, as well as the existence of "unacceptably ...
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  • Douglas, Shirley (1934–) 79% Douglas, Shirley (1934-) - Born in Weyburn in April 1934, Douglas is the daughter of Irma and T.C. Douglas , former Saskatchewan Premier. She attended the Banff School of Fine Arts, then studied at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, and acted in British television and theatre. Douglas continued to develop her acting career after her return to Canada. ...
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  • Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 79% The first branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Saskatchewan was organized in Regina on April 23, 1934 with about forty members. The Saskatoon Saskatchewan Stake was divided in October 2001, and the Regina Saskatchewan Stake was formed to oversee all units of the Church in southern Saskatchewan while the Saskatoon Saskatchewan Stake retained jurisdiction over all units in northern Saskatchewan. Eric Slocombe of Saskatoon was called as president of the Saskatoon ...
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  • Brewing and Fermentation 79% The most enduring ventures were the Moose Jaw Brewing and Malting Company (1906–36); Prince Albert Breweries (then Sick’s Prince Albert Brewery, Molson Saskatchewan Brewery) (1924–86); Regina Brewery (then Sick’s Regina Brewery, Molson Regina Brewery, Molson Saskatchewan Brewery) (1907–2002); Adenac Brewing Co. (then Drewry’s Regina Brewery, Blue Label Brewery, Carling Breweries, Carling O’Keefe Breweries) (1928–80); the Saskatchewan Brewing Co ...
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  • Bradley, Judy Llewellyn (1952–) 79% Bradley, Judy Llewellyn (1952-) - Born in Regina on October 18, 1952, Judy Bradley ( née Bratt) grew up on the family farm in the Milestone-Gray area. She earned a BSc and a BEd from the University of Regina , taught biology at Sheldon Williams Collegiate in Regina, and later returned to Milestone to teach elementary and special education. Bradley was elected in Bengough-Milestone in the 1991 general election, and re-elected in 1995 to represent the newly redistributed riding of ...
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  • Danube Swabians 77% st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:. 0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso- ...
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  • 77% st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:. 0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso- ...
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  • Architectural Influence 77% After the province was created in 1905, Toronto firm Darling and Pearson, well known for its bank projects, acted as provincial architects and completed the Land Titles building in Regina (1907– 09) and the Moose Jaw Courthouse (1908–09). Architectural firms from Montreal had a prominent role during the early years. In the 1980s, a consortium of firms including prominent Canadian architect Arthur Erickson and the Saskatoon firm Folstad & Friggstad Architects completed a ...
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  • Media: Newspapers, Television and Radio 77% However, the CBC-TV signal was available in Saskatchewan through privately owned TV stations like CKCK (Regina), CFQC (Saskatoon), CKBI (Prince Albert), CJFB (Swift Current) and CKOS (Yorkton). Notable commercial media groups in Saskatchewan have been the Sifton family (which by the 1970s owned the Leader-Post and StarPhoenix , CKCK-Radio and TV, and several media properties outside of the province) and the Rawlinson radio group (which started in Prince Albert, and acquired stations in North ...
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  • Polish Settlements 77% Father Pander also served a number of other churches in the area with sizeable Polish contingents: St. Columbkille at Grenfell (1903); St. Anne at Kipling (1907); and St. Patrick at Glenavon (1909). As more Polish settlers came, they were mostly responsible for the establishment of St. Anthony at Rama (1922), St. Anne at Buchanan (1929), and St. Andrew Babola near Invermay. This new wave of immigration led to a sizeable Polish presence in a number to churches that had already been ...
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  • World War II and Saskatchewan 77% Within a few weeks of the declaration of war two regiments, the Saskatoon Light Infantry and the South Saskatchewan Regiment , were mobilized. General A.G.L. McNaughton , a native of Moosomin, led the Division, which also included the Princess Patricia Canadian Light Infantry, a brigade laced with Saskatchewan recruits; indeed, volunteers from Saskatchewan could be found in many different units. Saskatchewan also contributed many airmen to the war effort, and took part in training Allied ...
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  • World War I and Saskatchewan 77% World War I and Saskatchewan - From August 4, 1914, when Britain's declaration of war brought Canada into World War I, two attitudes prevailed in Saskatchewan: one was a determination to defend all things British, and the second was an appreciation for jobs and wages which peace had not provided. The 95th Saskatchewan (later Regina) Rifles and the 105 Fusiliers (later Saskatoon) both fought with the 11th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), and in turn sent many ...
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  • Women and Politics Since the 1970s 77% Women and Politics Since the 1970s - Women's participation in politics from the time of their enfranchisement (1916) to 1970 usually involved casting ballots and participating in auxiliary party organizations: they were rarely acceptable as policy-makers or as candidates. During the 1970s criticism of women's subordinate and limited place increased in all parties; most pronounced among New Democrats, the party's response to that criticism (and to women's issues) led some women to dismiss ...
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  • Swimming 77% Swimming - Competitive swimming was slow to evolve in Saskatchewan. Swimming was confined to natural bodies of water until pools were built in Regina in 1909, Moose Jaw in 1910, and Saskatoon in 1913. There are ten "winter" clubs that compete year-round: Battlefords Kinsmen, Manta Ray (Meadow Lake), Moose Jaw Kinsmen Flying Fins, Prince Albert Sharks, Regina Optimist Dolphins, Regina's Y's Men's Marlins, Saskatoon Goldfins, Saskatoon Lasers, Swift Current Monarchs, and Yorkton Optimist. ...
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  • Stoughton 77% When the railway surveyed and named the present townsite Stoughton, New Hope disappeared as people relocated to be on the rail line. One of the best-known rinks in Canadian curling history, the Richardson rink, came from Stoughton. The Richardson rink was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame, and skip Ernie Richardson was honoured with the Order of Canada in 1978. ...
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  • Soo Line Railway 77% Soo Line Railway - Founded in 1883 by Minneapolis millers, and known originally as the Minneapolis and then the Saint Paul & Sault Ste. Marie, the Soo Line railway derived its name from the pronunciation of "Sault." The Soo Line was built to provide a shorter, cheaper route for western grain to the eastern seaboard; it was later expanded to Emerson, Manitoba. ...
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  • Sisters of Charity of St. Louis (SCSL) 77% Sisters of Charity of St. Louis (SCSL) - The Sisters of Charity of St. Louis, a teaching congregation, was founded in France in 1803 in the aftermath of the French Revolution. In 1913 the Sisters of Charity of St. Louis came to Moose Jaw, where they established St. Louis College, a school for boys. Radville welcomed the Sisters in 1915 when St. Louis Academy was built, followed in 1922 by St. Olivier Elementary School. ...
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  • Shaunavon 77% Shaunavon - Town, pop 1,775, located 53 km S of Gull Lake and 76 km N of the Canada-US border. On September 17, 1913, the CPR offered lots for sale on the Shaunavon town site. Three buildings have been declared heritage properties: the Shaunavon Courthouse, completed in 1927, which since 1958 has also served as the town hall; the Grand Hotel, built in 1929; and the Shaunavon Hotel, built in 1915. ...
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  • Saskatchewan Roughriders 77% Regina's first organized rugby football team were members of Regina's North-West Mounted Police (NWMP) who traveled to Winnipeg to play two games against the Winnipeg Football Club in 1888. The Regina team played its first Grey Cup in 1923, losing to Queen's University 54-0. The team played its second Grey Cup game on December 1, 1928, in the first Grey Cup game ever covered by radio broadcast. On December 3, 1932, the Regina Roughriders became the first team to win five Division ...
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  • Saskatchewan Registered Nurses’ Association (SRNA) 77% Saskatchewan Registered Nurses' Association (SRNA) - The Saskatchewan Registered Nurses' Association (SRNA) is the professional, self-regulatory body for the registered nurses of the province. The SRNA is the official voice of nursing in the province, speaking out on health care issues on behalf of registered nurses and the public. The current power and authority for the SRNA comes from The Registered Nurses Act, 1988, which describes the Association's mandate and role in setting standards ...
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  • Saskatchewan Police Commission 77% Saskatchewan Police Commission - The Saskatchewan Police Commission is a body corporate created under statute. Subject to the approval of the Lieutenant Governor in Council, the commission is responsible for regulations under the Municipal Police Discipline Regulations, 1991, the Municipal Police Clothing and Rank Regulations, 1991, the Municipal Police Equipment Regulations, 1991, the Municipal Police Recruiting Regulations, 1991, the Municipal Police Training Regulations, 1991, and the ...
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  • Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) 77% Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) - Just prior to the end of World War II , the United Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (headquartered in New York), in co-operation with the Canadian Congress of Labour (now the CLC), launched a drive to organize workers in Saskatchewan. Also in the late 1940s, RWDSU members in Saskatchewan established the Saskatchewan Joint Board to coordinate the affairs of local unions in the province. Today the RWDSU Saskatchewan Joint ...
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  • Religion 77% The formation of the United Church of Canada in 1925, through the union of Congregationalist, Methodist and the majority of Presbyterian churches, changed the religious statistics reported in subsequent censuses; “unionist” congregations account for the United Church numbers before 1925. In addition to religious traditions that reflect the belief systems of the majority of residents (Christianity and Aboriginal traditions), Saskatchewan is home to many smaller communities holding ...
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  • Prehistoric Art 77% Prehistoric Art - Saskatchewan's inventory of the archaeological sites and artifacts that survive today is enriched by a wide variety of art, although the particular climatic and soil conditions of Saskatchewan are inimical to preservation of items other than the most durable. Both parietal or rock art (rock paintings and carvings on immovable stone surfaces) and portable art objects have been found. Other stone portable and semi-portable art creations include a small number of hard stone ...
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  • Population Trends 77% By 1931 the Saskatchewan population already numbered close to a million and represented 8.9% of the total Canadian population; in fact Saskatchewan had the third largest population of any province in Canada, after Ontario and Quebec. The urbanization of the Aboriginal population ( see Aboriginal population trends) has contributed to urban growth: in 2001, 36.2% (47,070) of the Aboriginal identity population was on reserve, compared to 46.7% (60,840) in urban places, including 26.8% (34,935) ...
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  • Organization of Saskatchewan Arts Councils (OSAC) 77% Organization of Saskatchewan Arts Councils (OSAC) - Since 1968, OSAC and its members have been instrumental in integrating culture into the lives of Saskatchewan residents. The main purpose of the original arts councils was to sponsor the Festival of the Arts organized by the Saskatchewan Arts Board . OSAC provides the Saskatchewan Art on the Move Visual Arts Touring Program and Performing Arts Programs to its members. ...
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  • Oil and Gas Industry 77% Oil and Gas Industry - Saskatchewan's oil production is second only to Alberta among Canadian provinces, and provides about 20% of all Canadian production. The discovery of oil in Saskatchewan faced additional difficulties as compared to Alberta because less information was available about the presence of oil and gas deposits. Although Saskatchewan production has grown over the years, Alberta oil and gas production has grown even faster. ...
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  • Norwegian Settlements 77% Norwegian Settlements - The Birch Hills settlement was probably the earliest Norwegian settlement in what is now Saskatchewan, as it began to develop as early as 1894. The first Norwegian Lutheran congregation was established at Hanley in 1903, followed almost immediately by congregations near Langham and Birch Hills-so that virtually all of Saskatchewan's Norwegian settlements had come into existence by 1910. Immanuel Norwegian Lutheran Congregation, founded at Naicam in 1910, held all of ...
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  • Newlove, John (1938–2003) 77% Newlove, John (1938-2003) - Poet John Newlove was born on June 13, 1938 in Regina. Newlove lived with his mother in several eastern Saskatchewan communities, particularly Verigin and Kamsack, where he attended school. Newlove spent several years in Vancouver reading about mythology and the history of exploration in Canada while learning the craft of poetry from artists and poets, among them Brian Fisher and Roy Kiyooka , also from Saskatchewan. ...
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  • Murray, Gertrude (1912–) 77% Murray, Gertrude (1912-) - Gertrude Murray was a leader in Canada in the field of school broadcasts and telecasts: the extensive co-operative plan she and others established made possible a high standard of school broadcasting across Canada. Following Normal School in Moose Jaw, Gertrude Murray taught school in Saskatchewan for thirteen years and then joined the Department of Education in the Audiovisual Branch. Murray prepared radio programs for every weekday from October to May each year; ...
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  • Milling 77% Milling - Grain milling is the process of grinding and separating wheat and other cereal grains into flour, animal feed, and other products such as rolled, flaked or dehulled grain products. The prairie milling trade was dominated by these two companies until Western Canada Flour Mills and Maple Leaf Mills (both est. In Humboldt, a 100-barrel mill, the McNab Flour Mill, was established in 1913 when A.P. McNab moved a mill from Saskatoon to the town. ...
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  • Hail 77% Hail - Summertime thunderstorms in Saskatchewan frequently generate hail. Many farmers purchase hail insurance on their crops, in addition to general crop insurance. Crop hail-risk underwritten usually amounts to half a billion dollars or more annually; premiums collected and losses paid average $20 million a year. ...
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  • Grand Trunk Pacific Railway 77% Grand Trunk Pacific Railway - Constructed between 1905 and 1914, the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway served as a western extension to the Grand Trunk Railway that operated in Quebec, Ontario, and the northeastern United States. The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway was incorporated in 1903 as a subsidiary of the Grand Trunk Railway. By 1923, the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, the Grand Trunk Railway, and the National Transcontinental merged with the Canadian Northern Railway to form the new Canadian ...
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  • Grain Elevators 77% Grain Elevators - To understand the purpose and the form of grain elevators is to understand the grain economy which formed the basis of prairie settlement. Many other companies were formed and also entered the elevator business, such as Alberta Pacific Grain Company, Pioneer Grain Company , Norris Grain Company, British Co-operative Wholesale Society, Scottish Co-operative Wholesale Grain Company, Parrish and Heimbecker , McCabe Brothers Grain Company, Pioneer Grain, and N.M. Paterson and ...
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  • Girl Guides 77% Girl Guides - Girl Guides, an organization that emphasized physical, moral and spiritual training, was founded in England in 1909 as a counterpart to Boy Scouts. Saskatchewan Guides sold the first Girl Guide cookies in Canada in 1927; they were successful even during the Depression, and by 1936 they were commercially produced. The Saskatchewan Girl Guide movement blossomed during the 1950s and 1960s: in 1955 there were about 4,000 Guides, Brownies and leaders in communities throughout the ...
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  • Elliott, Moses (1854–1939) 77% Elliott, Moses (1854-1939) - Moses Elliott, a prominent ranching pioneer in the Maple Creek area, was born in Carleton County and later lived at St. Marys, Ontario, where as a young man he worked as a clerk in Timothy Eaton's original store. At Maple Creek Moses and Emily began ranching and raised a family of one son and three daughters. Nephew Vernal Elliott called in the RCMP; when questioned, Zalenko claimed that Moses had hanged himself. ...
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  • Councils of Women 77% Councils of Women - Inspired by formation of the International Council of Women in 1888, women created local councils across Canada during the 1890s. In 1919, the Provincial Council of Women in Saskatchewan was organized; its president was W.C. (Christina) Murray , wife of the University of Saskatchewan president and western vice-president of the National Council of Women. The Provincial Council of Women was a powerful force in mobilizing Saskatchewan women. ...
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  • Competitive Games 77% The inception of the nationwide Jeux Canada Games has been followed by more regional and specialized gatherings: Western Canada Summer Games, Saskatchewan Games, and North American Indigenous Games. Jeux Canada Games are staged for both summer and winter sports, each in four-year cycles; Winter Games began in 1967, and Summer Games in 1969. Western Canada Summer Games (WCSG) are held every four years in the odd-numbered year between Jeux Canada Summer Games. ...
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  • Community Support for People with Intellectual Disabilities 77% Community Support for People with Intellectual Disabilities - At the time the province of Saskatchewan was formed, people with intellectual disabilities, then referred to as "mentally retarded," were treated in the same way as those with psychiatric disabilities. In 1968, the Saskatchewan Association of Rehabilitation Centres (SARC) was formed by eight community agencies operating vocational workshops for people with intellectual disabilities. Trends in institutional versus community living ...
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  • Catholic Health Care 77% Catholic Health Care - In Saskatchewan, Catholic health care began when communities of religious women arrived in the region (North-West Territories). Between 1907 and 1952, religious congregations established hospitals in many communities which otherwise would have been without such services, namely St. Paul's, Saskatoon*; Grey Nuns', Regina; Holy Family, Prince Albert; Notre Dame, North Battleford; St. Elizabeth's, Humboldt*; Providence, Moose Jaw; Gabriel, Ponteix; St. Joseph's, Macklin; ...
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  • Canadian Federation of University Women (CFUW) 77% Canadian Federation of University Women (CFUW) - Committed to the pursuit of knowledge, promotion of education, encouragement of culture, improvement of women's status and human rights, participation in public affairs, and advancement of international friendship, the CFUW has had a strong Saskatchewan presence. Open to university graduates, and formerly known as University Women's Clubs, Saskatchewan groups emerged during World War I . In 1915 a club was organized in Regina, and in 1918 the ...
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  • Beug, Lorne (1948–) 77% Beug, Lorne (1948-) - A long-time Regina resident, Lorne Beug has practiced as a visual artist for over thirty years. In 1972, he enrolled in the University of Regina's ceramics program, where he studied with Marilyn Levine and Joe Fafard . In the late 1980s, Beug shifted to photo-collage, using images of architectural detail on existing buildings to construct his own edifices. ...
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  • Berting, Jacqueline (1967–) 77% Berting, Jacqueline (1967-) - Berting was born in St. Gregor, Saskatchewan on August 9, 1967. Jacqueline Berting’s most famous work to date is The Glass Wheatfield , encompassing 14,000 waist-high glass wheat stalks standing in a 36-square-metre “field. In 1996, she and her husband created The House of Perception , a clear-glass and iron house consisting of 400 sand-cast glass panels. ...
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  • Baseball 77% Baseball - Settlers from the United States and eastern Canada brought baseball with them when they moved west in the decades after Confederation. Independent professional and semi-pro leagues have come and gone throughout the province's history, but only the Western Canada League (1909-11, 1913-14, 1919-21) has operated in Saskatchewan as a fully sanctioned member of the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues. During and after World War II , twenty-five women from ...
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  • Bannatyne-Cugnet, Jo (1951–) 77% Bannatyne-Cugnet, Jo (1951-) - Best-selling children’s author Jo (Elizabeth Jo-Anne) Bannatyne-Cugnet was born on July 19, 1951, in Estevan and grew up in that city. Bannatyne-Cugnet wrote to learn for herself and to teach her four sons about life on a prairie farm. Regina composer Elizabeth Raum was inspired by Bannatyne-Cugnet’s work to write a symphony for children, “A Prairie Alphabet Musical Parade,” which has been recorded by the Regina Symphony Orchestra . ...
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  • Astroblemes 77% The largest, 35 km in diameter, is the deeply eroded multi-ring Carswell structure, located in northwest Saskatchewan. Gow Lake, about 160 km north-northeast of La Ronge, is a 5 km-diameter circular lake with a central island, Calder Island, upon which impact melt rocks and fall-back breccias are preserved. Deep Bay, near the south end of Reindeer Lake , is 11 km in diameter and up to 220 m deep. ...
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  • Arts and Culture 77% This stream of “prairie radicalism” was fed by diverse branches (right wing and left), and quickly came to define the social history of Saskatchewan, making it a “politics” deeply embedded in its culture. This was certainly the case in the arts, wherein Saskatchewan people came to rely on local resources and on art “made in Saskatchewan. Saskatchewan—“the heartland of Canadian football”—came to be so identified because of the unparalleled ...
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  • Agriculture and Food 77% In addition, Canadian grain companies were formed (N.M. Paterson and Sons Grain Company, Pioneer grain company, and Parrish and Heimbecker Grain Company), which still exist today. E.A. Partridge, a Saskatchewan farmer, led a movement through the Territorial Grain Growers Association (later the Saskatchewan Grain Growers Association) to form the first of several farmer-owned co-operative elevator companies. The marketing boards in question are the Saskatchewan Milk Control Board, the Chicken ...
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This web site was produced with financial assistance
provided by Western Economic Diversification Canada and the Government of Saskatchewan.
University of Regina Government of Canada Government of Saskatchewan Canadian Plains Research Center
Ce site Web a été conçu grâce à l'aide financière de
Diversification de l'économie de l'Ouest Canada et le gouvernement de la Saskatchewan.