The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan

 

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 Nov 24, 1909 - The Saskatchewan Grain Growers' Association petitioned the provincial government to establish a system of publicly-owned grain elevators.

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  • Estevan Coal Strike 96% Estevan Coal Strike - In the summer of 1931, 600 men and boys worked in the almost two dozen underground mines of the Souris Coal Fields of southeastern Saskatchewan. The mine owners still refused to bargain, and instead brought in scabs (replacement workers) to reopen three of the biggest mines on September 16. Mass picketing by hundreds of striking miners sent the scabs away, and the mines once again closed. Because of the employers' stiff opposition towards the Mine Workers Union of ...
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  • Saskatchewan Minerals 92% Saskatchewan Minerals - Saskatchewan Minerals' inception as a Crown corporation dates back to 1948, when a low-grade sodium sulphate plant was officially opened at Chaplin, Saskatchewan, by Premier T.C. Douglas . Saskatchewan Minerals flourished through the 1950s and 1960s as demand for sodium sulphate grew. In 1984, Saskatchewan Minerals closed its low-grade sodium sulphate plants at Mossbank and Gladmar, and introduced state-of-the-art equipment at its Chaplin plant, which enabled ...
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  • Temple Gardens 92% Temple Gardens - People have been enjoying the rejuvenating, soothing and mineral-rich geothermal waters, drawn from ancient sea beds 1,350 metres below the surface, at Temple Gardens Mineral Spa in downtown Moose Jaw since 1993. The mineral-rich water was discovered accidentally in 1910 by a crew drilling for oil. The mineral water is similar to the waters from the Upper Hot Springs in Banff, Alberta, the Radium Hot Springs in British Columbia and the famous mineral pools in Bath, England ...
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  • Miners, Victoria “Tory” (1888–1956) 89% Victoria, or "Tory," Miners played a vital role in changing the working conditions of female teachers in the province. The formation of the Saskatoon Women Teachers' Association (SWTA) took place in 1915; by 1918, with Miners as president, the SWTA became the largest teachers' local in the province. As well as working to acquire better pay for teachers, Miners also influenced teachers to advance their own education. ...
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  • Mineral Resources 87% Mineral Resources - Saskatchewan has a wealth of mineral resources and ranks fourth in Canada in terms of the value of mineral production. In 1857 the Palliser Expedition documented the presence of coal seams in the Estevan area, and in 1859 gold was discovered in the North Saskatchewan River by prospectors en route to the Cariboo gold rush in central British Columbia. Other key events in Saskatchewan's mining history include: the first oil well, drilled at Fort Pelly in 1874; the first ...
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  • Bienfait 86% The first viable coal mine was established a few kilometres south of the Bienfait town site at Roche Percée in 1891. That same year, Bienfait coal miners joined the Mine Worker’s Union of Canada and went on strike to try to force mine owners to recognize their union and to restore wages that had been cut ( see ESTEVAN COAL MINERS STRIKE ). The Depression years hit the coal mining industry hard, but another development which was to affect miners significantly was the beginning ...
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  • Real Property 86% The Dominion Lands Act , 1872 (An Act respecting the Public Lands of the Dominion, S.C. 1872, c.23, s.10) established the present survey system, based on the American model of quadrilateral sections, ranges and townships (An Act Concerning the Mode of Surveying the Public Lands of the United States. 14 provided the framework for provincially held land, including leased land for mineral and forestry development, and ranch land. This new system integrated land survey and land titles ...
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  • Buller, Annie (1896–1973) 86% Buller, Annie (1896-1973) - Annie Buller was an important figure in the development of the militant, radical wing of the Canadian labour movement and the Communist Party of Canada. Annie Buller was born in Montreal in 1896 to a working class family. Annie Buller was one of the founding members of the Communist Party of Canada. ...
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  • Mining 86% Mining - Mining is the third largest industry in Saskatchewan. Since that time the province has made tremendous advances in mineral exploration, making Saskatchewan the third largest, non-fuel, mineral and coal producing province in the country. Reserves of potash are found across the southern plains of the province, and large deposits of uranium have been located in McArthur River, Cigar Lake, Rabbit Lake, McClean Lake, Cluff Lake and Key Lake. ...
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  • Workers’ Unity League 85% Only a small number of workers were organized within their own specialties: the Trades and Labour Congress (TLC) was composed exclusively of international craft unions; the Canadian Congress of Labour (CCL) consisted of exclusively Canadian craft and industrial unions; and the Canadian Catholic Congress of Labour (CCCL) was limited almost entirely to Quebec. In Saskatchewan, the WUL was active in organizing miners under the auspices of the Mine Workers' Union of Canada (MWUC) in the Bienfait ...
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  • Scarlett, Sam (d. 1941) 85% 1941) - Sam Scarlett, a skilled machinist, a talented athlete and football player, and a superb public speaker, was one of the most interesting and colourful labour activists in Saskatchewan trade union history. In the late summer of 1931 Sam Scarlett and other organizers for the Mine Workers Union of Canada were sent to the Bienfait-Taylorton area to organize a union among the underground coal miners. Scarlett was in poor health at the time, but his obvious commitment to the workers and ...
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  • Subsurface Geological Laboratory 85% Subsurface Geological Laboratory - The Saskatchewan Subsurface Geological Laboratory in Regina is a centralized provincial repository of drill hole cores and cuttings from wells drilled for the exploration and development of petroleum and natural gas, industrial minerals, and sedimentary uranium deposits. The present laboratory building was constructed in 1958 under the administration of the Saskatchewan Department of Mineral Resources (now Saskatchewan Industry and Resources) as a ...
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  • Dowling, Donaldson Bogart (1858– 1925) 83% Dowling, Donaldson Bogart (1858- 1925) - Born in Ontario on November 5, 1858, Dowling graduated from McGill University with a Bachelor of Applied Science in 1883. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries he worked extensively in Saskatchewan, as well as in northern Manitoba, Ontario and Alberta. In 1899 Dowling was the first to recognize the mineral potential of the future Flin-Flon/ Sherridon mining district, but he is best known for his geological mapping of coal and other mineral ...
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  • Cameron, Alexander C. (1907–96) 83% Cameron, Alexander C. (1907-96) - Alex Cameron was born in Avonhurst on June 30, 1907. In the 1948 Saskatchewan election Alex Cameron won the Maple Creek seat for the Liberals. In 1964 Premier Thatcher appointed Cameron Minister of Mineral Resources, which he held until the Liberals lost the 1971 election. ...
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  • Mineral Detection 83% Mineral Detection - Robert Kerrich and Derek Syman at the University of Saskatchewan became pioneers in applying new detection methods for base-precious metals, with the potential for giving Canadian mining companies a decided advantage in evaluating new finds. Recently, Kerrich led a $1 million research project for a consortium of fourteen Canadian mining companies. The four-year project used high-tech equipment to detect trace elements in rocks; results may help pinpoint ancient volcanic ...
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  • Science and Technology 81% This increase in scientific research necessitated expansion, and the NRC gave rise to a number of other agencies to lead and support research in science and technology, defense, medicine, atomic energy, and space. The presence of the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology and of the Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies allows for the provincial training of the workforce so important for the successful development of technology-based industry. At the beginning of ...
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  • Potash Industry 81% Potash Industry - Potash production is a major Saskatchewan industry, which has played a significant role in the economy for over 40 years. Underground potash deposits were laid down by evaporation in an ancient inland sea; three major layers of potash are separated by layers of salt. Production commenced in 1962 when water problems were overcome at the International Minerals and Chemical (IMC) mine near Esterhazy; the Potash Company of America (PCA) then rehabilitated its flooded mine. ...
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  • Manitou Beach 81% Manitou Beach - Resort village, pop 212, located 5 km N of Watrous on Hwy 365. The resort developed early in the 20th century when settlers discovered the mineral waters of Little Manitou Lake, long known to the region’s indigenous population. The resort village was incorporated in 1919, and excursion trains brought vacationers and health-seekers from across the prairies to the lake and the spas that developed. ...
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  • Evans, Arthur “Slim” (1890–1944) 81% Evans, Arthur "Slim" (1890-1944) - Born on April 24, 1890, in Toronto, Arthur H. "Slim" Evans left school at the age of 13 to help support his family. To protest the welfare of unemployed single men in Prime Minister R.B. Bennett's "slave camps" in the early 1930s, Evans conceived and later led the most substantial labour protest in Canadian history, the On-to-Ottawa Trek . After the trek was stopped in Regina on orders from the Prime Minister, Evans led a delegation invited to Ottawa on ...
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  • Sodium Sulphate 81% Sodium Sulphate - Natural sodium sulphate deposits are found in several alkaline lakes with constrained drainage in the southern part of Saskatchewan. Saskatchewan is a world leader in naturally produced sodium sulphate, currently producing 6% of the total world supply. There are presently 21 major sodium sulphate deposits, with more than 500,000 tonnes of sodium sulphate mineral deposits in each. ...
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  • Labour - Three Centuries of Working for Wages in Saskatchewan 81% It was a small workforce: in 1820, at the peak of fur trade activity, there were fewer than 2,000 wage workers employed by the fur companies. Nevertheless, fur trade workers did launch a number of strikes in support of improved wages and working conditions. The building trades workers, like the railway running trades before, brought their union organizations with them to the west. ...
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  • Economy of Saskatchewan 81% ( See Table 1.) ( see forestry, oil and gas industry, potash industry and uranium) The Modern Saskatchewan Economy The production and export of natural resources and their refined products is the backbone of the Saskatchewan economy. Saskatchewan Business In 1997, Saskatchewan had approximately 30,000 firms registered to operate with province-based headquarters; 27,000 sole proprietorships; and 8,000 firms with out-of-province headquarters but registered with Saskatchewan Justice to ...
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  • Transportation 79% Introduction The vastness of Saskatchewan’s land-locked prairie, woodlands and Precambrian Shield has always created transportation challenges. The major fur trade routes of Saskatchewan were the Churchill, Athabasca and North Saskatchewan river systems. Under contract with the provincial Highways department, the Hatchet Lake First Nation provides seasonal barge transportation service to the community of Wollaston Lake in northeastern Saskatchewan. ...
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  • Travel and Tourism 79% Travel and Tourism - The tourism industry in Saskatchewan, which includes over 5,500 individual tourism operators and organizations providing services to the tourist, is comprised of eight major sectors: passenger transportation (scheduled and charter air, rail, boat, bus, taxicab and limousine services); travel services and travel trade (travel agencies, tour operators, other travel arrangements and reservations services); arts, entertainment and recreation (theatre companies and dinner ...
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  • Scott, Thomas Walter (1867–1938) 79% Scott, Thomas Walter (1867-1938) - Walter Scott was born on a farm near Ilderton, Ontario, on October 27, 1867. From 1905 to 1916, the Scott government used the co-operative model to assist farm families to build and maintain a rural telephone system and the Saskatchewan Co-operative Elevator Company. Reverend Murdock MacKinnon, a Presbyterian minister in Regina, launched a public campaign against the Scott government for its legislative amendments to the School Act, which, according to ...
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  • Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) 79% Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) - The SRC is the provincial organization dedicated to applying science and technology to Saskatchewan's economic development since 1947. Created to advance development of the province in the physical sciences, SRC has become a market-driven corporation, selling services and products to companies in Saskatchewan and throughout the world. Originally, when SRC had a staff of three people, research was conducted by providing grants-in-aid to specific applied ...
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  • Mollard, J.D. (1924–) 79% Mollard, J.D. (1924-) - Born on a farm near Watrous, Saskatchewan, in 1924, Jack Mollard is an internationally honoured engineer, geoscientist, teacher, author, and consultant. He takes delight in searching for hidden gravel and groundwater sources, spotting and avoiding terrain hazards, locating dams to store runoff waters, discovering northern transportation routes, and prospecting for oil, gas and economic minerals, including diamonds and gold. Jack Mollard has published over 100 ...
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  • Messer, John Rissler (1941–) 79% Messer, John Rissler (1941-) - Born May 26, 1941, Jack Messer was raised in the Tisdale area. After re-election in 1975, Messer was moved into Industry for a year, then was appointed Minister of Mineral Resources. Re-elected in 1978, Messer resigned from the Legislature in 1980 to return to business. ...
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  • Geographical Memorial Tributes 79% Geographical Memorial Tributes - Geographical memorial tributes preserve the names of the many servicemen who lost their lives during World War II . As post-war mineral exploration and other economic activities expanded across northern Saskatchewan, officially gazetted names appeared as geographic locations on these topographic maps, identifying many thousands of lakes, islands, bays, creeks and rapids-all unique geographic features. There are over 14,000 geographic features represented on ...
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  • Esterhazy 79% Esterhazy - Town, pop 2,348, is located SE of Melville at the junction of Hwys 22 and 80. The town was named for Count Paul Oscar Esterhazy, who settled the first 35 Hungarian families in the area, establishing what came to be known as the Kaposvar Colony. The development of the potash industry in the late 1950s and early 1960s had a dramatic impact on Esterhazy’s progress. International Minerals and Chemicals Corp. (IMC) began construction of the world’s largest potash mine, K1 ...
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  • Elk Point Sea 79% Elk Point Sea - The Elk Point Sea was a shallow waterway that extended southeastward from the present Northwest Territories to the Williston Basin of North Dakota, southwestern Manitoba and southeastern Saskatchewan. Eight underground mines and two subsurface solution projects in Saskatchewan which produce from the potash zones account for a third of the world’s commercial production; in 2000, potassium chloride production approximated fourteen million tonnes, with an export value of ...
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  • Crow’s Nest Pass Agreement 79% Crow's Nest Pass Agreement - On September 6, 1897, Ottawa agreed to provide a $3.4 million subsidy to Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) to build a rail line through the Crow's Nest Pass, from Lethbridge, Alberta to Nelson, British Columbia. This subsidy allowed CPR to compete directly against American railroad companies transporting minerals out of the Kootenay region of British Columbia; in return, the CPR was obligated to fixed grain transportation rates in perpetuity for western Canadian ...
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  • Christensen, David A. (1936–) 79% In addition to teaching, research and extension activities, Christensen has served Canadian agriculture by participating on numerous boards and committees such as the Saskatchewan Dairy Association, British Columbia Department of Agriculture Dairy Project, Prairie Feed Resource Centre, Dairy Farmers of Canada, the Agricultural Institute of Canada International Development Committee, Saskatchewan Livestock Association, Saskatchewan Advisory Committee on Animal Nutrition, and Canadian Society ...
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  • Watrous 79% Watrous - Town, pop 1,808, located 110 km SE of Saskatoon at the junction of Hwys 2 and 365. Manitou Beach became a popular resort destination, and the town of Watrous greatly benefited over the years as throngs of tourists passed through the community en route to the lake. CBK Radio station’s 50,000-watt transmitter far exceeded the expectations of providing coverage for the prairie provinces: engineers estimate that to equal the coverage of CBK, an eastern radio station would have ...
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  • Moose Jaw 79% Moose Jaw - Moose Jaw, pop 32,131, is the province's fourth largest city. Moose Jaw is connected to three major highways, the Canadian Pacific Railway mainline and a branch line of the Canadian National Railway , and is served by two bus lines. The city is serviced by two cable companies, four radio stations, a daily newspaper (the Moose Jaw Times Herald ), and a weekly newspaper ( Moose Jaw This Week ). ...
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  • Blakeney, Allan E. (1925–2011) 77% Allan Emrys Blakeney was Premier of Saskatchewan between 1971 and 1982. Following his return to Canada, Blakeney went to work for the government of T.C. Douglas. Blakeney turned quickly to improving health and social programs—a dental program for children, a prescription drug program, subsidized housing, home care, and a guaranteed income supplement to improve the lot of the elderly poor. ...
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  • Molloy, Tom (1883–1959) 77% In 1907, as president of the Typographers’ Union, he helped establish the Regina Trades and Labour Council and served as its president. Molloy assisted with the development of credit unions in Saskatchewan by developing legislation in 1937. He served on other local, national and international credit union organizations, and is recognized as the father of credit unions in Saskatchewan. ...
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  • Western Canada Sedimentary Basin 77% Western Canada Sedimentary Basin - A sedimentary basin such as the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin is a large geological feature comprised of thick sedimentary deposits. The Western Canada Sedimentary Basin forms the northern portion of a much larger basinal feature that extends from the Gulf of Mexico to the mouth of the Mackenzie River. In simplest terms, the Western Canada Basin may be regarded as a wedge of sub-horizontal sedimentary strata above Precambrian crystalline basement. ...
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  • Viewfield Impact Structure 77% Viewfield Impact Structure - (49°35’N; 103°34’W). Viewfield Impact Structure is one of five verified meteorite impact structures in Saskatchewan, and an example of one of the 150 known sites in the world. Other confirmed meteor impact structures in Saskatchewan are Carswell, Gow Lake, Deep Bay, and Maple Creek. Viewfield Impact Structure is located south of the town of Stoughton. ...
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  • Uranium City 77% Uranium City - Uranium City is located on the northern shore of Lake Athabasca , 724 km northwest of Prince Albert and 48 km south of the Saskatchewan–Northwest Territories border. As a result, the provincial government created the remote community of Uranium City with input from Eldorado Nuclear, specifically to support uranium mining activities in the region. While closure of the mines marked the beginning of the end for Uranium City, it was not the end of uranium mining as new, ...
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  • Uranium 77% Uranium - Uranium is one of the most abundant elements in the earth's crust: it is 500 times more common than gold. Mining companies sell Saskatchewan uranium to electric power utilities in Canada, the United States, Europe, and the Far East. In 1949, a uranium mine was developed in the Beaverlodge area, and three years later Uranium City was established as the hub for uranium mining. ...
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  • United Steel Workers of America (USWA) 77% The Steelworkers, spearheaded by Terry Stevens, a steelworker organizer from Winnipeg, were successful in organizing Duval Corp. (PCS Cory Local 7458), Cominco (Agrium Local 7552), Allan Potash (PCS Allan Local 7689), and Central Canada Potash (IMC, Local 7656) between 1968 and 1971. Workers at Potash Company of America (PCS Patience Lake Local 189) became Steelworkers in 1972 when their former union, United Stone and Allied Product Workers Local 189, merged with USWA. Bargaining at the new ...
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  • Ukrainian Labour Farmer Temple Association 77% Ukrainian Labour Farmer Temple Association - The Ukrainian Labour Farmer Temple Association (ULFTA) grew out of the Ukrainian Social Democratic Party (USDP) in May 1918 in Winnipeg, in response to a growing conservative reaction to the left-wing political activities in Canada that followed the Russian Revolution. They built a Labour Temple in Winnipeg with donations from members across the country, initiated a variety of cultural programs, and printed a national weekly, Ukrainian Labour News ...
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  • Sports and Recreation in Saskatchewan - History 77% In the late 1970s, Saskatchewan Sports and Recreation Unlimited and the Saskatchewan Sports Hall of Fame moved into the Land Titles Building in Regina, thanks to funding from the Saskatchewan government and the Saskatchewan Lotteries Trust Fund for Sport, Culture and Recreation. In 1977, Saskatchewan Sports and Recreation Unlimited and Sask Sport Inc. decided to incorporate sport, recreation and cultural organizations into one building, known as the Administrative Centre for Provincial Sport ...
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  • Soils 77% Soils - Soils are natural bodies formed by the cumulative effects of climate, vegetation, geological material, topography, and drainage. The C horizon represents the largely unaltered geologic deposit and is commonly referred to as the soil parent material, or the material from which the soil was developed; in most Saskatchewan soils the C horizon occurs between 50 and 100 centimetres. The Dark Gray Chernozemic soils have somewhat lighter-coloured surface horizons than those of the Black ...
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  • Saskatoon 77% Saskatoon - Saskatoon, pop 196,811, is situated on the banks of the northward-flowing South Saskatchewan River , 235 km northwest of Regina, 348 km north of the US border, and 225 km east of the Alberta border. In 1906, the villages of Saskatoon, Nutana and Riverdale (now Riversdale) amalgamated to form the city of Saskatoon, with a population of 4,500. The population soared over the next decade, new railway lines were constructed, and Saskatoon became the major distribution centre for ...
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  • Saskatchewan Mining Association Inc. 77% - The Saskatchewan Mining Association Inc. is a not-for-profit corporation owned by the mining companies active in the province. In 1965, probably triggered by the growth of the potash industry, the organization adopted a more province-wide mandate, changing its name to the Saskatchewan Mining Association; its headquarters were moved to Regina. The Association's main objectives are to inform and advise members of existing laws, regulations and policies affecting the mining industry. ...
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  • Saskatchewan 77% Saskatchewan - The name Saskatchewan is derived from Cree kisiskâciwanisîpiy , meaning “swift-flowing river. Saskatchewan had the highest proportion (15.1%) of inhabitants over 65 in Canada, but also relatively more people under 20 years of age (29.2% versus 25.9% for Canada). 12% came from manufacturing or construction, and 67% from an ever-increasing range of service industries (Figure SK-1). Export trade is important to Saskatchewan; in 2003 the largest single export ...
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  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police 77% Royal Canadian Mounted Police - The Mounted Police's connection to Saskatchewan predated the creation of the province by over thirty years. The Mounted Police that soon established itself across the prairies, eventually choosing Regina as its headquarters and the location for its training depot, was not a normal police force. Despite being replaced by the Saskatchewan Provincial Police (SPP), the RNWMP, which became the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) in 1919, never left Saskatchewan. ...
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  • Quill Lakes 77% Quill Lakes - (51°55’N, 104°22’W (Big Quill Lake) Map sheet 72 P/16). Three lakes constitute Quill Lakes: Big, Little and Middle Quill (or Mud Lake). Measures to protect wildlife include designation of the islands in Middle Quill Lake as a provincial wildlife refuge to preserve colonies of American white pelicans ( Pelecanus erythorhynchos ), and the 1998 designation as an Important Bird Area (IBA). The lakes were named for the bird quills collected and shipped to ...
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  • Prairies 77% Thus grassland, aspen parkland, and montane forest regions constitute the Prairie Ecozone in Canada. They are generally thinner in the Prairie Ecozone than in the Boreal Plain Ecozone, and parts of the Cypress Hills and Wood Mountains were not glaciated. Chernozemic soils are synonymous with a grassland vegetation, so the entire Prairie Ecozone is dominated by them. ...
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  • Poultry Farming and Industry 77% There are four marketing boards in the poultry area in Saskatchewan: Chicken Farmers of Saskatchewan , Saskatchewan Broiler Hatching Egg Producers Marketing Board , Saskatchewan Commercial Egg Producers Marketing Board, and Saskatchewan Turkey Producers Marketing Board . Saskatchewan poultry farming has also become specialized and can be divided into four major components: farms devoted to egg production for human consumption; farms that keep multiplier breeder flocks to provide broiler ...
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  • Plant Diseases 77% Plant Diseases - Plant diseases have accompanied humans throughout their evolution, affecting the quality and quantity of food available to them. Plant diseases and the associated science of plant pathology that studies causes of plant diseases, gained attention in Saskatchewan at the beginning of the 20th century, when severe epidemics of the stem rust fungus caused serious losses in wheat. In the Department of Biology, where the laboratory was initially housed, courses on fungi and plant ...
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  • Palliser and Hind Expeditions 77% Palliser and Hind Expeditions - John Palliser, an aristocrat who served in the British army, first explored the North American west in 1847 and 1848 when he travelled from Louisiana to modern-day Montana. Palliser's expedition left Britain in 1857 and travelled first through the USA before entering Canada at Sault Ste. The Hind expedition was formally named the Canadian Red River, Assiniboine and Saskatchewan Exploring Expedition; it was directed and funded by the Province of Canada and led ...
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  • Maki, David Michael (1944–) 77% Maki, David Michael (1944-) - Born at Whitewood, Saskatchewan, on August 16, 1944, David Maki attended elementary school in a one-room log building. He played a key role in stopping the Devine government's plans to privatize Saskatchewan Government Insurance , and was on the interim planning group of the Saskatchewan Coalition for Social Justice which organized two of the largest demonstrations in Saskatchewan history, on April 18, 1987 and June 5, 1989, against the Devine government's cut ...
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  • Makahonuk, Glen (1951–97) 77% Makahonuk, Glen (1951-97) - A senior library assistant at the University of Saskatchewan , Glen Makahonuk served as president of the Saskatchewan division of the Canadian Union of Public Employees from 1992 until his untimely death in 1997. During the same period, he served as president of CUPE Local 1975 (representing University of Saskatchewan support workers), regional and general vice-president on CUPE's National Executive Board, and vice-president with the Saskatchewan Federation of ...
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  • Livestock Feed Industry 77% Livestock Feed Industry - Saskatchewan's feed ingredient industry is estimated to be valued at $1.6 billion or 36% of total value of the crops produced. The feed industry has several components: feed ingredient producers (farmers and producers of byproducts), specialty feed ingredient producers, commercial feed processors and on-farm feed processors. The largest segment by value is that of feed ingredient producers who produce the crops and byproducts for processing into animal feed. ...
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  • Little Manitou Lake 77% Little Manitou Lake - (51°44’, 105°30’W: Map sheet 72/P 12). Located in central Saskatchewan just north of Watrous, Little Manitou Lake is named for the Algonquian word meaning “mysterious being. In the 1950s the 290-acre park was divided, with part going to the Saskatchewan Society for Crippled Children (for Camp Easter Seal) and the remainder forming Manitou Lake Regional Park. During the 1980s a new spa was developed, and the old 1928 Danceland building restored, ...
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  • Landslides 77% Landslides - Slopes affected by landslides are common in southern Saskatchewan. Geotechnical studies in the Frenchman River Valley north of Climax revealed that the valley is about 80 m less deep and almost three times wider than the original glacial meltwater channel; the valley fill is composed largely of landslide deposits. Sediment-laden runoff from landslides affects the geometry and water quality of nearby streams, producing downstream impacts that often represent more significant ...
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  • Labour and Politics 77% Labour and Politics - For the first few decades of the 20th century, workers had not yet become a majority in Canada and only a small percentage of mainly skilled tradesmen were organized into trade unions. Indeed the Farmer's Union of Canada, a forerunner of the United Farmers of Canada, was founded in 1921 by former members of the One Big Union, a radical industrial union founded in 1919. Changes were underway in labour politics as the trade unions adapted to the evolving political ...
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  • Kuziak, Alex Gordon (1908–) 77% Kuziak, Alex Gordon (1908-) - Born October 15, 1908, in Canora, Alex Kuziak was educated in Canora, Yorkton, and Saskatoon. He also operated a real estate and insurance office in Canora and was the senior partner of Canora Electric and Heating. He served on the Canora School Board, Canora Union Hospital Board and on local co-operatives. ...
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  • Kalium Chemicals 77% Kalium Chemicals - Kalium Chemicals first began production and sale of potash in Saskatchewan in 1964 at Belle Plaine, west of Regina. Still in operation today, the Belle Plaine mine is considered the world’s lowest-cost potash mine, producing high-purity white potash for use in industrial products such as water softeners, alkaline batteries, and food sweeteners and additives. Production at Kalium Chemicals’ solution mine in Belle Plaine and at Noranda Mines’ potash ...
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  • Hungarian Settlements 77% Hungarian Settlements - Over a quarter of a century, beginning in 1885, Hungarian immigrants developed at least ten named settlements in three regions of Saskatchewan. As Hungarian settlement quickly spread southward toward the Qu’Appelle River , by 1888 the extended colony became known as Kaposvar, after the Hungarian city where the Esterhazy family estates were located. Eventually this Hungarian settlement spread southeastward around Muskiki Lake, where Hungarians mixed with ...
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  • Grasses and Grasslands, Native 77% Grasses and Grasslands, Native - The native grasslands of Saskatchewan are part of the Grassland Biome that once stretched from the prairie provinces as far south as Mexico. Mixed grassland is drier than Tall Grass Prairie and Fescue Prairie. Restoration ecologists are improving their ability to re-establish native grassland species in areas where the original grassland has been destroyed. ...
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  • Forage Crops 77% Forage Crops - Forage crops are grass and legume plant species that are grown for livestock feed as well as land conservation and reclamation. Forage crops are fibrous in nature; ruminant livestock, such as cattle and sheep, require this fibre in their diet for proper digestion. Both annual and perennial plant species are used as forage crops, but perennials are much more commonly utilized. ...
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  • Extra-parliamentary Politics 77% Extra-parliamentary Politics - Extra-parliamentary politics has fundamentally shaped Saskatchewan. Since 1949 the Saskatchewan Farmers Union has used extra-parliamentary actions in support of such things as the Crow rate and the Wheat Board, and to oppose GMO crops. There was a prolonged campaign, including blockade of the road to the Rabbit Lake uranium mine at Wollaston Lake in 1984-85. Such protests continue: in August 2004 the Clearwater Dene blocked the highway going through their ...
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  • Explorers 77% By 1810, David Thompson and Peter Fidler had compiled maps of nearly all the major waterways; nevertheless, the mapping of Saskatchewan was not completed until the mid-1940s. In 1857-60, the British government sent John Palliser ( see Palliser and Hind Expeditions ) to explore the area between the Assiniboine River and the Rocky Mountains. In 1858, the Canadian government sent Henry Youle Hind and Simon J. Dawson to explore the area between Lake Winnipeg and the South Saskatchewan River . ...
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  • Estevan 77% Estevan - The city of Estevan (pop 10,242), named after the registered telegraphic address of George Stephen, the original president of the Canadian Pacific Railway , was incorporated on March 1, 1957. On La Vérendrye’s 1734 “Map of the West,” a trade and hunting corridor called the Warriors Trail was marked in the vicinity of Estevan. Growth was accelerated by the centralization of electrical power production and the development of coal and oil resources in the ...
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  • Ecozones and Ecoregions 77% The ecodistricts, differing in soil development, relief, and plant cover are: Dunvegan Lake Upland, Eynard Lake Upland, Robins Lake Upland, Striding River Upland, Nueltin Lake Plain, and Seale River Plain. The ecodistricts are: Athabasca Dunes, Carswell Plain, McTaggert Plain, MacFarlane Upland, Livingstone Plain, Squirrel Lake Plain, Fond du Lac Lowland, Lower Cree River Plain, Pasfield Lake Plain, Pine River Plain, Cree Lake Upland, and Wheeler Upland. The ecodistricts are: Black Birch ...
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  • Dunning, Charles Avery (1885–1958) 77% Dunning, Charles Avery (1885-1958) - Charles Dunning was born July 31, 1885, in Leicestershire, England. The Saskatchewan Liberals officially severed ties with the unpopular federal party to avoid the creation of a farmers' party in Saskatchewan. As the federal Progressive Party began to wane, Dunning became more actively involved in federal politics and was eventually able to re-establish formal ties between the provincial and federal levels of the Liberal party . ...
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  • Diamonds 77% Diamonds - Diamonds are a crystalline form of carbon. Areas of interest for exploration in the province include the Choiceland, Fort à la Corne, Pasquia Hills, Molanosa Arch, Candle Lake, Sturgeon Lake, Smoothstone Lake and Wapawekka Lake areas. Several micro-diamonds (less than 0.5 mm) have been found in the province since then; larger diamonds (macro-diamonds) have also been found during some exploratory drilling, but there have been no signs of large stones or sites. ...
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  • Dairy Farming 77% Dairy Farming - Milk production for sale to processing plants began in Saskatchewan in the late 1890s. These include Dairy Farmers of Canada, which is a national policy, lobby, and dairy product promotion organization; individual farm milk production quotas are set by provincial regulatory boards according to Canadian Dairy Commission guidelines. The Canadian Dairy Network is involved in the genetic evaluation of Canadian dairy bulls and cows. ...
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  • Crown Corporations 77% Crown Corporations - Crown corporations are companies owned by the Saskatchewan government on behalf of the people of the province. The Government Finance Office (predecessor of Crown Investments Corporation of Saskatchewan) was formed in 1947 as a holding company for the province's commercial Crown corporations; besides being a holding company, it developed broad policy control, directed investment, and routed dividends from the Crowns into the government’s consolidated fund. Crown ...
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  • Cowley, Elwood Lorrie (1944–) 77% Cowley, Elwood Lorrie (1944-) - Born August 2, 1944, Cowley was raised in Kinley, near Perdue. Cowley was president of the NDP youth at university and also the provincial NDP youth wing. In 1975, Cowley was moved to the portfolio of Provincial Secretary but was also assigned the responsibility to form the Saskatchewan Potash Corporation. ...
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  • Conservation 77% The recognition that natural habitats throughout the world were being lost led to the development of natural reserves, such as Canada’s National Park system, and to a variety of government agencies and citizens’ groups ( see conservation agencies ). These areas range from international projects (e.g., the Chaplin Shorebird Sanctuary; Nature Conservancy of Canada sites), through national initiatives (the two national parks; national wildlife areas; national bird sanctuaries), to ...
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  • Climate Change: The Past 77% Climate Change: The Past - Global climate changes, and their consequences for human populations, are known from studies of the climate of the recent geological past. Instrumental climate records generally do not capture the full range of climate variability and long-term trends (i.e., climate change) because they are mostly confined to the past 150 years. Proxy climate data span millions of years and thus define what is possible in terms of natural climate change and variability, providing ...
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  • Canadian National Railway 77% Canadian National Railway - Canadian National Railway (CNR), incorporated on June 6, 1919, took form through a series of mergers between 1917 and 1923, uniting several older and financially troubled railways, many of which had been built between 1850 and 1880. In 1918 the federal government combined the operations of the government-owned Canadian Government Railways and the privately owned Canadian Northern Railway, bringing CNR into existence. CNR then took control of the Grand Trunk ...
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  • Bush Pilots 77% Bush Pilots - It was in August 1924 that the first aerial survey pilots flew into northern Saskatchewan. Many of these early bush pilots in northern Saskatchewan received their wings with the Air Force in World War I . However, aircraft that flew north in the 1920s and 1930s were often mechanically unreliable and not well designed for the task: with no radio communication, reliable maps or weather reports, bush pilots relied on their ingenuity to fly into northern regions. By 1940, many of ...
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  • Bell, John Milton (Milt) (1922–98) 77% Bell, John Milton (Milt) (1922-98) - Milt Bell joined the faculty of the Department of Animal Husbandry at the University of Saskatchewan in 1948. Bell served as president of the Canadian Society of Animal Science in 1952, also serving on the editorial board of the Journal of Nutrition , the Canadian Journal of Animal Science , and the Journal of the European Association of Animal Production . Bell, the first recipient of this award, chose not to accept the cash award, and directed that the ...
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  • Bastedo, Frank Lindsay (1886–1973) 77% Bastedo, Frank Lindsay (1886-1973) - Born in Bracebridge, Ontario in 1886, Frank Bastedo received his law degree from the University of Toronto in 1909. Frank Bastedo was appointed eleventh Lieutenant-Governor of Saskatchewan in 1958 by the federal government of John Diefenbaker . Mr. Bastedo had not consulted the federal government, and the Diefenbaker government passed an Order-in-Council giving the legislation royal assent. ...
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  • Arts and Culture 77% This stream of “prairie radicalism” was fed by diverse branches (right wing and left), and quickly came to define the social history of Saskatchewan, making it a “politics” deeply embedded in its culture. This was certainly the case in the arts, wherein Saskatchewan people came to rely on local resources and on art “made in Saskatchewan. Saskatchewan—“the heartland of Canadian football”—came to be so identified because of the unparalleled ...
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  • Agriculture and Food 77% In addition, Canadian grain companies were formed (N.M. Paterson and Sons Grain Company, Pioneer grain company, and Parrish and Heimbecker Grain Company), which still exist today. E.A. Partridge, a Saskatchewan farmer, led a movement through the Territorial Grain Growers Association (later the Saskatchewan Grain Growers Association) to form the first of several farmer-owned co-operative elevator companies. The marketing boards in question are the Saskatchewan Milk Control Board, the Chicken ...
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  • Aboriginal Peoples of Saskatchewan 77% Non-Treaty Indians are members of First Nations, primarily the Dakota, who have reserves and are recognized as having Indian Status under the Indian Act, but were not signatories to treaties. Politics and Governance The announcement of the Trudeau government’s Indian Policy of 1969, which advocated termination of Indian treaties, rights and reserves, galvanized the First Nations of Canada to organize nationally under the National Indian Brotherhood (NIB). In 1982, the Federation of ...
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This web site was produced with financial assistance
provided by Western Economic Diversification Canada and the Government of Saskatchewan.
University of Regina Government of Canada Government of Saskatchewan Canadian Plains Research Center
Ce site Web a été conçu grâce à l'aide financière de
Diversification de l'économie de l'Ouest Canada et le gouvernement de la Saskatchewan.